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Inpatient Rehabilitation Unit opening at Community Hospital

Inpatient Rehabilitation Unit

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Brenda Moore (831) 625-4544
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MONTEREY, Calif. — An Inpatient Rehabilitation Unit (IRU) is set to open at Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula on Monday, filling a gap in intensive inpatient rehabilitation care on the Peninsula.

The unit will serve patients with neurological issues such as stroke and other traumatic brain injuries, as well as patients with multiple trauma, non-traumatic spinal cord injury, loss of limbs, Guillain–Barré syndrome, and other debilitating diagnoses.

“The IRU was established in direct response to the demonstrated need in the community,” says Mario Ruiz, an occupational therapist and the unit’s director. “Patients who needed intensive therapy after treatment at a hospital or other acute-care facility could not get it on the Peninsula. Some traveled across the county, some out of the county, and others simply did not get the treatment that could have enabled them to live life to its fullest potential.”

Ruiz and Dr. Jihad Jaffer, the unit’s medical director, will lead a multidisciplinary clinical team dedicated to the unit. Jaffer, board certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation, will also practice at Peninsula Primary Care in Marina.

The IRU team includes physical, occupational, and speech therapists, rehabilitation nurses, and a social worker who serves as case manager. Team members work in consultation with other doctors, dietitians, diabetes educators, wound-care specialists, and others. The goal is helping people regain independent living skills, to return home and to their lives.

Patients will participate in an intensive schedule of rehabilitation therapy, a minimum of three hours a day, five days a week, with an average stay of  about two weeks.

“We tailor our services to meet each patient’s particular goals,” Ruiz says. “Is it to be able to walk five feet, or to get up the steps to see your grandchildren when visiting? Some people want to get back to their twice-weekly golf game, others to return to their job as a hotel concierge. Whatever their goal, we’re going to work on that. We train the family and the caregivers as well, so everyone is involved in the recovery process.”

A major injury or illness often divides a patient’s life into before and after, Ruiz says. 

“To suddenly lose your ability to do the simplest tasks changes everything,” he says. “We forget about the everyday things we do until we can no longer do them. In inpatient rehabilitation, our total focus is on helping patients recover their independence as fully as possible. And we will be there with them to celebrate their success at the end of the journey.”

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ABOUT COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula, established in 1934, has grown and evolved in direct response to the changing healthcare needs of the people it serves. It is a nonprofit healthcare provider with 207 staffed acute-care hospital beds and 28 skilled-nursing beds, delivering a continuum of care from birth to end of life, and every stage in between. It serves the Monterey Peninsula and surrounding communities through locations including the main hospital, outpatient facilities, satellite laboratories, a mental health clinic, a short-term skilled nursing facility, Hospice of the Central Coast, Peninsula Wellness Center, and business offices. Find more information about Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula at http://www.chomp.org/