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Wound care - Robert McGibben

Just before Christmas, Robert McGibben smacked his leg on a piece of old wood, leaving a significant gash on his shin. Despite focused attention and what seemed like appropriate self-care, the wound developed a stubborn staph infection.

His doctor, Terry Franklin, referred McGibben to Community Hospital's Wound Care Program, where specialist Barbara Dangerfield scheduled a series of treatments every three to four days.

"Barbara really did a wonderful job on me," says McGibben. "She cleaned the thing up and brought out special tissue, which had silver strips in it, to draw out infection. She put some medicine on the wound, put the special tissue over the area, and enclosed the area by wrapping my leg."

Dangerfield also put a special product over the wound, on which she marked the size of the gash to keep a weekly record of its circumference. That way, she could watch to see if the wound was getting bigger or smaller. Over the course of two to three weeks, McGibben watched the cut close in, becoming smaller and smaller until it was healed.

"I'll tell you," he says. "There was no sitting around for me or the therapists. Appointments were on time, and everyone was very, very competent. I'm very impressed with the whole operation. Right from the moment I checked in downstairs, until I got up to the Rehabilitation Services department, I received expeditious care."

McGibben, now 70, has enjoyed a career in investment banking. He lived on the Peninsula during the late '80s and early '90s, and he and his wife Joan returned to Carmel just more than a year ago.

"We have a black lab I run with along the ocean every morning," he says, "and I like to swim, play golf, do a little skiing. I live an active life, so I'm happy to have that episode behind me. They do an amazing job at CHOMP, they really do."