Chris Tseh, Transporter

Ten years ago, Chris Tseh joined Community Hospital as a parking valet. Three years later, he went “inside” to become a transporter, moving patients instead of cars.

 

 

Chris Tseh, TransporterChris Tseh, Transporter

“This job is definitely more demanding — more physical and more personal — and I am helping people out more directly,” Tseh says.

After a two-week training program followed by job-shadowing with an experienced transporter, Tseh began wheeling patients on gurneys or in wheelchairs to and from their rooms, helping clinical staff lift or reposition patients, and helping to weigh bedridden patients with an “easy-lift” device.

“My job is really physical,” says Tseh. “I walk 15 to 18 miles a day, and it takes a lot of strength to lift or move a patient, or even to push the gurneys.

“But the most important part of my job isn’t pushing a gurney. it’s connecting with patients, people who are not used to being in the hospital, who don’t feel well, who might be nervous. I talk with them, take an interest in them, let them know I see them as a person as I take them from here to there. I’m a person with a big heart, so if I can do something to help them out during our little walk, I’m on it. It’s about giving good service, which is sincere service.”

Transporters are multitaskers. On call throughout their shift, they are flexible and available to assist doctors and nurses, other clinical staff, and volunteers. “We’re an engine of this place,” Tseh says. “We help keep it running.”