Coronary CT angiography

Advanced Cardiac Imaging

CT Scanner Cardiac CT angiography and cardiac calcium scoring

When it comes to your heart, you don't want to take any chances. You want the kind of advanced care that you would receive at a world-class facility. Thankfully, you won't have to travel far to get it.

A leader in technology

Here on the Peninsula, you have access to the Siemens SOMATOM Definition dual-source scanner. When the scanner was installed at Community Imaging Center at Ryan Ranch in 2007, it was only the third of its kind on the West Coast. We have since added an identical scanner in the Radiology department at Community Hospital, giving emergency and inpatients access to the best technology when minutes count the most.

The scanner produces 200 images per second, providing stunning 3-D pictures of the heart. The images are so clear, it may even eliminate the need for patients to undergo invasive procedures to diagnose their heart disease. Read more about our state-of-the-art scanner.

Expert interpretationHeart

To make our great technology even better, both a cardiologist and a radiologist interpret the results of each cardiac CT angiography exam. This interdisciplinary approach gives you the expertise of two medical specialists, resulting in a thorough interpretation and well-rounded clinical recommendations.

When is Cardiac CT Angiography recommended?

Cardiac CT angiography and cardiac calcium scoring are used to determine if fatty deposits or calcium deposits have narrowed a patient's coronary arteries, and if the patient is at risk for coronary artery disease. The exam is an especially helpful tool for diagnosing patients who:

  • are at high risk for coronary artery disease but do not have typical symptoms such as chest pain, shortness or breath, fatigue, etc.
  • have unusual symptoms for coronary artery disease but are at low or moderate risk
  • have unclear or inconclusive stress test results

What is cardiac calcium scoring?

Calcium deposits in the arteries are a key indicator of risk for coronary artery disease. The amount of calcium, also known as plaque, will be measured using the images from your cardiac CT scan. Your calcium score is a number that expresses the amount of plaque in your arteries.

Learn more about what to expect during your cardiac CT angiography scan.